{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}

{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}

OFTEN DESCRIBED as the quintessentially American photographer, Irving Penn used simple monochromatic backdrops to portray his subjects—often women of inimitable beauty—wearing Cristóbal Balenciaga coats or Christian Dior gowns. In fact, his photographs were so unique, said he had earned his “aesthetic copyright” only 3 years after starting work at the magazine. Rather than focusing on fashion, Penn emphasised beauty, whether it was the perfect neckline of a black dress, a brunette model, or the interior design of a hotel in Morocco . . .

Victoria

{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}

{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}

{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}

{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}

{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}

{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}

{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}

{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}

{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}

{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}

“A good photograph is one that communicates a fact, touches the heart, and leaves the viewer a changed person for having seen it; it is in one word, effective.” —Irving Penn.

{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}

{arts & culture | photographer : irving penn}


[Images – (out of order – my fault —Roséline) :1 – Vogue // 2 – The English Group // 3 – National Portrait Gallery // 4, 5, 6, 8, 11 – Anthony Luke // 7 – Coffee Vogue // 9 – Couture Allure // 10 – Photography Office // diptych : one / two // rose – pinterest]