From the Editor

Site Update: Your Favourite Things Back at The Shop & a New Contributor to TIG

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Your Favourite Things Back at The Shop & a New Contributor to TIG
Your Favourite Things Back at The Shop & a New Contributor to TIG
Your Favourite Things Back at The Shop & a New Contributor to TIG

Introducing … New Contributor Louise to This Is Glamorous

IF YOU FOLLOW ALONG on Instagram, you may remember a beautiful grid of tiny illustrations featured there nearly a year ago; they were done by Interior Designer & Illustrator, Louise, who is currently based in Edinburgh. After the pleasure of a few lunches and cosy chats over wine in favourite pubs, it became clear that Louise would be a wonderful addition to This Is Glamorous and recently made her debut as Interiors Editor.

Read her articles on Gustavian stylebeautiful pink rooms to fall in love with, and most recently, an At Home With featuring Melissa Odabash, if you have not done so already. We are thrilled to welcome Louise as part of the TIG family and know you will love her work as much as well do.

And in other exciting news, some of your very favourites from shop.thisisglamorous.com & Belgrave Crescent are back and available for Pre-Order . . .

The wonderfully chic illustration by Louise that began it all — a few shots from the This Is Glamorous Instagram account that she casually put together . . .

Your Favourite Things Back at The Shop & a New Contributor to TIG

And congratulations to Victoria, who just found out that she will be interning at British Vogue this summer. She will, of course, continue her role here as Fashion Contributor, bringing you beautiful articles such as An Italian Winter & Gucci Girls.

>>> Read Victoria’s articles here.

Your Favourite Things Back at The Shop & a New Contributor to TIG

“It isn’t what you have or who you are or where you are or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy. It is what you think about it.” ―Dale Carnegie

News 16.04.21 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

For an empire that collapsed more than 1,500 years ago, ancient Rome maintains a powerful presence. About 1 billion people speak languages derived from Latin; Roman law shapes modern norms; and Roman architecture has been widely imitated. Christianity, which the empire embraced in its sunset years, remains the world’s largest religion. Yet all these enduring influences pale against Rome’s most important legacy: its fall. Had its empire not unravelled, or had it been replaced by a similarly overpowering successor, the world wouldn’t have become modern.

Style Inspiration: How to Dress this Spring

There are no big trends this season, with the exception of slingback pumps from Prada, everything orange, and lots cable-knit sets. For the first time in a long time, I can say that this is the season where styling comes before the trends. There is less attention on what you buy, but what you do with the pieces you buy or already have.

News 14.04.21 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

When it comes to memorialization, nothing beats a martyr—even when your culture has done the martyring. So it has seemed, anyway, in a nation where no fewer than twenty-six states—along with countless towns, sports teams, summer camps, and recreational vehicles—bear names meant to evoke those humans who came before.

In Design: A Penthouse by Melbourne-Based CJH Studio

YES, IT’S TRUE we are not often drawn to ultra-modern spaces, but there is something about this penthouse by Melbourne-based CJH Studio that is very appealing at this time of year. As the days are getting longer, perhaps it’s the space’s brightness that pulls us in …

Notes from the Weekend & a Few Lovely Links

YESTERDAY WE HAD drinks on the terrace of one of the local pubs for the first time in six months. It’s been a bit chilly lately, but yesterday it was sunny with clear blue skies and it felt, to be honest, a bit strange to be doing something so normal, but also really nice …

News 12.04.21 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

Facebook has repeatedly allowed world leaders and politicians to use its platform to deceive the public or harass opponents despite being alerted to evidence of the wrongdoing. The Guardian has seen extensive internal documentation showing how Facebook handled more than 30 cases across 25 countries of politically manipulative behavior that was proactively detected by company staff.