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Colour Inspiration: Pale & Perfect Pink

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Colour Inspiration: Pale & Perfect Pink

“. . . pink is positively associated with love, beauty, charm, politeness, sensitivity, tenderness, sweetness, childhood, femininity, and the romantic.”

SAID TO BE THE FAVOURITE colour of Princess Diana, it has been mine since 12, when I had my bedroom repainted in the most perfect shade of pink. This week’s Colour Inspiration is a celebration of this beautiful and unabashedly romantic shade . . .

From Here to Eternity Powder Pink Wool Cape | shop.thisisglamorous.com

New at The Shop: the FROM HERE TO ETERNITY Powder Pink Wool Cape, perfect for these early autumn days and in the most perfect shade of pink you will ever come across.

Colour Inspiration: Pale & Perfect Pink
Colour Inspiration: Pale & Perfect Pink
Colour Inspiration: Pale & Perfect Pink

From the Last Garden Picnic lookbook for Belgrave Crescent, shot in late summer 2013 — hard to believe that it was two years ago already . . .

Colour Inspiration: Pale & Perfect Pink
At the Office with This Is Glamorous | photo by Roseline @thisisglamorous on instagram

HOW THE COLOUR PINK AFFECTS US PHYSICALLY
Bright pinks, like the colour red, stimulate energy and can increase the blood pressure, respiration, heartbeat, and pulse rate. They also encourage action and confidence. Pink has been used in prison holding cells to effectively reduce erratic behaviour.

THE MEANING OF PINK AROUND THE GLOBE
The pink ribbon is an internationally recognized symbol of hope and awareness in the fight against breast cancer.

In Japan, the colour pink has a masculine association. The annual spring blooming of the pink-blossomed cherry trees (the Sakura) is said to represent the young Japanese warriors who fell in battle in the prime of life (the Samurai).

Jaipur City is a foremost tourist attraction in India because of its superlative forts, grandiose palaces, vivacious temples, multi-coloured bazaars, pulsating streets, and its distinguished pink colour to which the city owes its oft-used name “The Pink City”.

The Chinese had not recognized the colour pink until they had contact with Western culture and the Chinese word for pink translates as “foreign colour.”

Marrakesh is another city associated with the colour pink. It is sometimes referred to as the “Rose City” because of its salmon-pink coloured buildings and the red clay of its terrain.

INTERESTING INFORMATION ABOUT PINK
In 1947, fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli introduced the color “hot pink” to western fashion. She dubbed the shade “Shocking Pink,” though today the color is more well-known as “magenta.”

Pink encourages friendliness while discouraging aggression and ill-will. Since the color pink is said to have a tranquilizing effect, sport’s teams sometimes use pink to paint the locker room used by opposing teams.

Some studies of the color pink suggest that male weightlifters seem to lose strength in pink rooms, while women weightlifters tend to become stronger around the color.

Pastries taste better when they come out of pink boxes or served on pink plates (it only works with sweets).

Pink makes us crave sugar.

(from Sensational Color)

[i carry your heart with me(i carry it in]

BY E. E. CUMMINGS

i carry your heart with me(i carry it in
my heart)i am never without it(anywhere
i go you go,my dear;and whatever is done
by only me is your doing,my darling)
                                                      i fear
no fate(for you are my fate,my sweet)i want
no world(for beautiful you are my world,my true)
and it’s you are whatever a moon has always meant
and whatever a sun will always sing is you
here is the deepest secret nobody knows
(here is the root of the root and the bud of the bud
and the sky of the sky of a tree called life;which grows
higher than soul can hope or mind can hide)
and this is the wonder that’s keeping the stars apart
i carry your heart(i carry it in my heart)
Colour Inspiration: Pale & Perfect Pink
Colour Inspiration: Pale & Perfect Pink
Colour Inspiration: Pale & Perfect Pink
Colour Inspiration: Pale & Perfect Pink

I believe in pink. I believe that laughing is the best calorie burner. I believe in kissing, kissing a lot. I believe in being strong when everything seems to be going wrong. I believe that happy girls are the prettiest girls. I believe that tomorrow is another day and I believe in miracles”.Audrey Hepburn

Style Inspiration for Late-September’s Blustery Days

WHILE IT HAS been sunny lately and all the leaves are still wonderfully green with only a few touches of yellow here and there, and only a few that have fallen along pathways and around the foot of signs at coffee and ice cream shops, it was blustery today. The kind of blustery wind that has a coolness attached to it, the kind that is meant to shake leaves from trees and carry them away …

News 22.09.21 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s chief executive, signed off last month on a new initiative code-named Project Amplify. The effort, which was hatched at an internal meeting in January, had a specific purpose: to use Facebook’s News Feed, the site’s most important digital real estate, to show people positive stories about the social network. The idea was that pushing pro-Facebook news items — some of them written by the company — would improve its image in the eyes of its users, three people with knowledge of the effort said. But the move was sensitive because Facebook had not previously positioned the News Feed as a place where it burnished its own reputation. Several executives at the meeting were shocked by the proposal, one attendee said.

News 20.09.21 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

It’s simple, we are often told: All you have to do to maintain a healthy weight is ensure that the number of calories you ingest stays the same as the number of calories you expend. If you take in more calories, or energy, than you use, you gain weight; if the output is greater than the input, you lose it. But while we’re often conscious of burning calories when we’re working out, 55 to 70 percent of what we eat and drink actually goes toward fueling all the invisible chemical reactions that take place in our body to keep us alive. “We think about metabolism as just being about exercise, but it’s so much more than that,” says Herman Pontzer, an associate professor of evolutionary anthropology at Duke University. “It’s literally the running total of how busy your cells are throughout the day.” Figuring out your total energy expenditure tells you how many calories you need to stay alive. But it also tells you “how the body is functioning,” Pontzer says. “There is no more direct measure of that than energy expenditure.”

Notes from the Weekend & a Few Lovely Links

THIS WEEKEND WE were glued to the news, trying to find more information about the missing van-life blogger Gabby Petito and the generally strange circumstances surrounding the entire case. Coincidentally, we had been talking about the whole #vanlife phenomenon which has swept social media the past few years, because P had been watching videos of tiny homes and the algorithm began throwing converted vans across his path …

The Camaleonda Sofa by Mario Bellini

YOU MAY HAVE noticed a certain modular sofa set all over social media the past year and a half in the homes of celebrities and influencers alike, and you may even have known that it was the Camaleonda sofa, originally designed by Mario Bellini over fifty years ago, but did you know that it has become so popular in contemporary times that it was reissued in 2020? The Camaleonda currently has such a following, that four of the homes we featured recently here at TIG all included it: here, here, here, and here. In this instalment of Design History, we will be taking a closer look at the über-trendy Camaleonda, beginning with its designer, Mario Bellini.

News 17.09.21 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

For most of 2020, I passed the pandemic alone in my studio apartment. I turned 33, then 34, and my body seemed to grow old without bringing my spirit along with it. My right knee was clearly deteriorating — I couldn’t sit cross-legged at my desk the way I used to — and because I wasn’t wearing makeup, I could track each age spot as it bloomed to the surface. When I pulled my hair back in a tight ponytail, I could see a patch of scalp. But in that same period had my life evolved at all? Had I met anyone? Surprised myself? Stemmed the tide of collective crisis? My mother often urged me to dance, just a little, by myself in the kitchen — “It’s good medicine,” she said, “despojo.”

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