news

News 10.14.20 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

by

News 10.14.20 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets
@cuisiniere
News 10.14.20 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets
via @ssagittarrius
News 10.14.20 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets
@naning9_

When Facebook was founded, in 2004, the company had few codified rules about what was allowed on the platform and what was not. Charlotte Willner joined three years later, as one of the company’s first employees to moderate content on the site. At the time, she said, the written guidelines were about a page long; around the office, they were often summarized as, “If something makes you feel bad in your gut, take it down.” Her husband, Dave, was hired the following year, becoming one of twelve full-time content moderators. He later became the company’s head of content policy. The guidelines, he told me, “were just a bunch of examples, with no one articulating the reasoning behind them. ‘We delete nudity.’ ‘People aren’t allowed to say nice things about Hitler.’ It was a list, not a framework.” So he wrote a framework. He called the document the Abuse Standards. A few years later, it was given a more innocuous-sounding title: the Implementation Standards.

Read the rest of this article at: The New Yorker

News 10.14.20 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

Matthew McConaughey Wrote the Book on Matthew McConaughey

Matthew McConaughey knows there are people who think, “Gosh dang, McConaughey just eases right into everything.” He said he wrote “Greenlights” partly as a corrective.Devin Oktar Yalkin for The New York Times

Would it surprise you to learn that more than 30 years ago, before he’d even sauntered across the screen in “Dazed and Confused,”Matthew McConaughey wrote a poem in which he vowed he’d someday become an author?

As one of its lopsided verses declared:

I think I’ll write a book.
A word about my life.
I wonder who would give a damn
About the pleasures and the strife?

This was in 1989, when he didn’t know all the twists and turns that awaited him — the acting awards he’d win, the wife and children he’d have, the bracing dramas and banal rom-coms he’d make. But he was certain he would live a life worth chronicling.

Now that poem, rendered in its creator’s arcane handwriting, appears at the start of his autobiography, “Greenlights,” which Crown will publish on Tuesday.

The book offers a shotgun seat to all the l-i-v-i-n that McConaughey has accumulated, from his upbringing in a tumultuous Texas family to his ascent as the ruggedly serene star of “Magic Mike,” “True Detective” and “Dallas Buyers Club.”

McConaughey, who turns 51 on Nov. 4, enjoys spinning some of these personal yarns, not necessarily because they sound cool but because he believes they reveal certain universal and teachable truths.

Read the rest of this article at: The New York Times

“Is Machiavelli good, then, or is he evil?” asks the French scholar Patrick Boucheron in his discussion of The Prince, a book whose “whole program is to uncouple political action from conventional morality.” Is he advising political leaders to be treacherous, violent, and dishonest (as Diderot believed), or revealing to ordinary people the mechanisms behind their leaders’ dishonesty, violence, and treachery (as Rousseau believed)? “We would like to have an answer,” Boucheron writes, but the matter is better “set aside.” Machiavelli was simply saying “the truth about things.” Still, the question hangs in the air, if only because Boucheron’s anxiety over the deteriorating morality of politics today has him turning to the Italian for guidance.

Machiavelli has a way of prompting his commentators to assert their moral concerns. They do not want to be tarred with the villain’s brush. The British historian Alexander Lee closes his biography on a resolutely pious note: on his deathbed Machiavelli

Read the rest of this article at: The New York Review

News 10.14.20 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

News 10.14.20 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

Last May, Minneapolis City Council members found their leather seats on the raised dais and looked out at the chamber. Instead of an expanse of empty chairs, they saw a sea of faces: about 80 of them in all, young and old, Black, Latino, Asian, white. Council meetings are public, but the public didn’t usually show up, so council members debated among themselves about whether they should suspend the rules and allow time for the group — it was evident that the chamber was filled with a single, unified group — to have their say. The members deliberated for 20 minutes before deciding that the people could have 10.

Vanessa del Campo Chacón rose to speak. An immigrant from Veracruz, Mexico, who ran an in-home day care from her small apartment, Chacón spoke in Spanish, and a bearded young man knelt by her side and translated. This was Roberto de la Riva, co-director of Inquilinxs Unidxs por Justicia (United Renters for Justice), a tenants’ rights organization that also goes by the abbreviation IX. “I’m hours or days from being evicted, and I don’t think the city has deemed this pertinent enough to be involved and to take responsibility,” Chacón said. “We want dignified homes,” she continued. “I’m asking for my daughter and for all the families that are here.” As she spoke, two other tenants approached the dais and, standing behind the council members, unfurled a huge yellow banner that read, “Don’t Evict Vanessa.”

“I’m sorry,” the council president, Lisa Bender, interjected. “We can’t allow people to come back behind the dais.” A white woman with brown curls, Bender had garnered national attention for her ideas about how to promote affordable housing in Minneapolis. She was sympathetic to the tenants, but she also had a meeting to run. Before Bender could finish, the room erupted in chants. A Black man in a beret stood up and boomed: “If we don’t get it?”

Read the rest of this article at: The New York Times

News 10.14.20 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

Dolly Parton is loved for many reasons—the songwriting, the singing, the industry smarts, the cheeky cracks, the homey manner, the beauty, the verve, the hits. She is also loved for being loved, and loved transcendentally. During a red-hot summer marked in part by toppled monuments to slavery and genocide, a petition arose, directed at Tennessee lawmakers, calling for Parton to be pedestalled instead. “Let’s replace the statues of men who sought to tear this country apart with a monument to the woman who has worked her entire life to bring us closer together,” the petition proposed, soon gaining some twenty-three thousand signatories.

The country-music establishment can be about as partisan as they come, a rope line of old-school apple-pie values and unquestioning patriotism. But Parton is a true diplomat. A word like “crossover” scarcely encompasses a singer admired by Vanna White (who says Parton is her role model because she “hasn’t been affected by show business”), Björk (who has called Parton’s twanged crystal timbre “immaculate”), and Nicki Minaj (who nods Parton’s way in a guest verse on Drake’s “Make Me Proud”). A Dolly Parton concert is like a local census, bringing together peoples across lines of race, gender, sexuality, and, miraculously, political affiliation.

Read the rest of this article at: The New Yorker

P.S. previous articles & more by P.F.M.

Follow us on Instagram @thisisglamorous

At The Shop | New Arrivals: The Positano Woven Basket Tote