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At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC 2019 – Frida Kahlo, The Dutch Masters & more

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At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
@kokokourtney via tumblr
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Carl Eldh Studio Museum Stockholm, Sweden via The Venue Report

“Art does not reproduce what we see. It makes us see.” —Paul Klee

If what we see shapes who we are, what better reason is there to make an effort to see art? For me, art is a prelude to discovery; it is a symbol of a point in time and history that can help navigate the present and future.

In searching for art to see I have noticed that in New York, many exhibitions lead towards being completely somber or utterly frivolous. The Andy Warhol exhibition at the Whitney somehow manages to be both.

Somewhere in the middle are the following:

Frida Kahlo: Appearances Can Be Deceiving
February 8 to May 12, 2019
Brooklyn Museum of Art
@brooklynmuseum
200 Eastern Pkwy, Brooklyn, NY 11238

At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC

Frida (Standing by Basket), 1931 by Imogem Cummingham

The Brooklyn Museum is yet another institution that will showcase Frida Kahlo’s personal affects along with her art.

You could say the focus on Kahlo’s personal items and personal aesthetic overshadows her work. Or you could argue that her aesthetic is part of her art. Either way, I have yet to see an exhibition that does Kahlo justice, but Appearances is the largest exhibition in ten years in the U.S. dedicated to Kahlo, so I am hopeful.

Insight into the Artist:

The Commodification of Frida Kahlo: Are We Losing the Artist Under the Kitsch?
Excerpt: The Inconvenient Spectacle of Frida Kahlo

At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Frida’s Studio at La Casa Azul, The Frida Kahlo Museum via Pinterest
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Pastels at La Casa Azul, The Frida Kahlo Museum via Pinterest
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Portrait of Cristina My Sister, 1928 via Wiki Art
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Self-Portrait Dedicated tomLeon Trotsky, (Between the Curtains), 1937 via Wiki Art



In Praise of Painting: Dutch Masterpieces at the Met
October 16, 2018 to October 4, 2020
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue, New York NY 10028
@metmuseum

At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Woodland Road, 1670 by Meyndert Hobbema (Dutch, Amsterdam 1638–1709 Amsterdam)

There are times when you need an escape from conceptual art, when you need to see a beautiful painting. “Dutch Masterpieces” is this solution.

Here, the Met offers the experience of viewing its collection of paintings from the seventeenth century, “the Golden Age of Rembrandt, Hals, and Vermeer” specially curated to create a historical and visual experience of everyday life during this time. Themes include “Behind Closed Doors,” “Lives of Woman” and “Eloquent Things.”

Insight into the Exhibition:

Honoring a Legacy: The Conservation of Margareta Haverman's A Vase of Flowers
An audio guide of the exhibition

At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Curiosity, ca. 1660-62 by Gerard ter Borch the Younger
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Still Life with Poppy, Insects, and Reptiles, ca. 1670 by Otto Marseus van Schrieck
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
A Vase of Flowers, 1716 by Margareta Haverman
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Calm Sea, ca. 1600 by Simon de Vlieger
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Flora, ca. 1654 by Rembrandt van Rijn

Hilmfa af Klint: Paintings for the Future
October 12, 2018 to April 23, 2019
Guggenheim Museum
@guggenheim
1071 5th Ave, New York, NY 10128

At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Hilma af Klint in her studio, circa 1895

Hilmfa af Klint’s abstract art created between 1906 and 1920 is the subject for this exhibition. At the time, she realized that her art inspired by math, spirituality and botany would not be appreciated until sometime in the future, and her work remained virtually unseen until the 1980s.

Today she is considered a pioneer of abstract art and an artist who was ahead of her time, and ahead of other celebrated abstract artists that grace the walls of major museums.

Insight into the artist:

Notes from the Guggenheim
Hilma Who? No more

At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Rose Series Group II, The Eros Series, No. 5, 1907
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Group IX/SUW, The Swan, No. 1, 1915
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
The Ten Largest No. 2, 1907
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Installation View II
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Arial View of the Guggenheim
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Installation View II



The Judd Foundation
101 Spring Street
@juddfoundation

At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Judd Foundation at 101 Spring Street via The Judd Foundation

The Judd Foundation isn’t hosting a specific show, but I have been meaning to see to see this space for quite some time. The five-story building at 101 Spring Street served as artist Donald Judd’s studio and permanent residence from 1968 to his death in 1994.

It is difficult describe Judd’s art. He refused to be labeled a “minimalist.” He is known for his “three dimensional works” but I imagine that he wouldn’t want to be a sculptor either. His goal was to break away from European traditions, but also abstractionists who also claimed the same.

Overall, he seems like s a fascinating person.

Insight into the artist:

An interview with Flavin Judd
Questions to Stella and Judd

At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Judd Foundation at 101 Spring Street via The Judd Foundation
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Judd Foundation at 101 Spring Street via The Judd Foundation
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Judd Foundation at 101 Spring Street via The Judd Foundation
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Judd Foundation at 101 Spring Street via The Judd Foundation
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
101 Spring Street by Eric Petschek via Need Supply
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Untitled, 1966 at the MoMA via The Judd Foundation
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Judd Foundation at 101 Spring Street via The Judd Foundation

God Made My Face: A Collective Portrait of James
January 10—February 16, 2019
David Zwirner Gallery
@davidzwirner

At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
James Baldwin, New York, September 17, 1946. Photographed by Richard Avedon via Pinterest

For the Pulitzer Prize winning curator Hilton Als, James Baldwin is a vital source of inspiration whose influence has motivated his own writing. It is fitting that Als has curated this group exhibition that includes works by Richard Avedon, Beauford Delaney, Marlene Dumas, and Alice Neel to pay tribute to Baldwin.

Baldwin’s writing is in the midst of revival. Despite the adversities Baldwin faced in life, he used writing to create a rich life.

After viewing Als' curation of Alice Neel’s exhibition last year, which was impeccably organized, I look forward to seeing his tribute. As always, DZ is the perfect place to start when embarking on the galleries in Chelsea.

Insight into the exhibition:

Hilton Als Discusses James Baldwin's Legacy
James Baldwin’s Paris

At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Hôtel, rue de Varenne 19, 1900 by Eugène Atget
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Hilton Als, 2018 by Marlene Dumas
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
David Zwirner Gallery
At the Gallery | To See: Art in NYC
Harlem Nocturne, 1952 by Alice Neel

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Contributor, New York

Amber Fairweather is a writer and musician based in New York City. She is an avid traveler and has lived in California, Hawaii, rural Pennsylvania, and London. Her journeys fuel her quest to find and share the beauty in life. A few of her favorite things include books, roses, coffee, and photography.
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