fashion & shopping

Shopping: Things We Love for Spring | 25.02.16

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Shopping: Things We Love for Spring| 24.02.16

With the days becoming longer & brighter and there are already early Byzantine-coloured blossoms on the branches, the peonies can not be far along; but until then, here are a few things we love for Spring — silk pajamas and lacy bralettes, totes and glittery shoes and slip dresses the colour of blush . . .

Shopping: Things We Love for Spring
Shopping: Things We Love for Spring
Shopping: Things We Love for Spring
Shopping: Things We Love for Spring

somewhere i have never travelled,gladly beyond

E. E. Cummings, 18941962

somewhere i have never travelled,gladly beyond
any experience,your eyes have their silence:
in your most frail gesture are things which enclose me,
or which i cannot touch because they are too near

your slightest look easily will unclose me
though i have closed myself as fingers,
you open always petal by petal myself as Spring opens
(touching skilfully,mysteriously)her first rose

or if your wish be to close me,i and
my life will shut very beautifully,suddenly,
as when the heart of this flower imagines
the snow carefully everywhere descending;

nothing which we are to perceive in this world equals
the power of your intense fragility:whose texture
compels me with the colour of its countries,
rendering death and forever with each breathing

(i do not know what it is about you that closes
and opens;only something in me understands
the voice of your eyes is deeper than all roses)
nobody,not even the rain,has such small hands

New York Fashion Week 2019: Our NYC Editor’s Favourite Shows

New York Fashion Week came and went with little fanfare. This time around, there seemed to be a lack of enthusiasm for the affair.
Vanessa Friedman, the Fashion Director and Chief Fashion Critic for The New York Times expressed a similar sentiment in the article, “Marc Jacobs and the Ghosts of Fashion Past and Future.”
The article suggests a somber tone during fashion week. Friedman points out that it seemed to suffer from an identity crisis partially as a result from the loss of influence that New York designers once had over the fashion world.

News 02.18.19 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

TO PUT OUR toxic relationship with Big Tech into perspective, critics have compared social media to a lot of bad things. Tobacco. Crystal meth. Pollution. Cars before seat belts. Chemicals before Superfund sites. But the most enduring metaphor is junk food: convenient but empty; engineered to be addictive; makes humans unhealthy and corporations rich.

Notes from the Weekend & a Few Lovely Links

THIS NEW YEAR ALREADY seems to be flying by. For some, January was a very long month, but for us, it was one of industry and new beginnings, the start of new (good) habits and the keeping of resolutions, all of which we’ve (more or less) continued into this month, but with far less constraints. This weekend was one of those relaxing ones that one needs from time to time to recharge—long languid mornings and late brunches, books and films and wine and rambling conversations. There are big new projects and life plans in the future, but for the weekend, it was nice to stop time for a moment…

Playlist 02.16.19 : Five Songs for the Weekend

London’s 0171 understand that communication can be tricky. Who among us has not, at some point, not replied to a text or an email? Exactly. “1000 Words” gets at the deeper meanings behind this through the medium of a Glass Candy-esque piece of seductive electronic pop, complete with a stream of conscious vocal delivery.

News 02.15.19 : Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

“I read books to read myself,” Sven Birkerts wrote in The Gutenberg Elegies: The Fate of Reading in an Electronic Age. Birkerts’s book, which turns twenty-five this year, is composed of fifteen essays on reading, the self, the convergence of the two, and the ways both are threatened by the encroachment of modern technology.

Travel: The Prettiest Towns & Villages in Britain

A FEW YEARS ago P took me to visit an old school chum of his, Andrew, in the picturesque town of Ilkley in West Yorkshire. Located in the Wharfe Valley, at the southern end of the Yorkshire Dales, the town was as charming as they come, with its quaint little restaurants (think I ordered Sole au Gratin) and perfect little English pubs where one of the old men from the village even asked my fancy self if I were “on the television”.

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