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In the News 24.10.14 : Today’s Articles of Interest from around the Internets

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In the News 24.10.14 : Today’s Articles of Interest from around the Internets In the News 24.10.14 : Today’s Articles of Interest from around the Internets In the News 24.10.14 : Today’s Articles of Interest from around the Internets In the News 24.10.14 : Today’s Articles of Interest from around the Internets

Today’s Articles of Interest from Around the Internets

 


1. Google makes us all dumber: The neuroscience of search engines

“In 1964, Pablo Picasso was asked by an interviewer about the new electronic calculating machines, soon to become known as computers. He replied, “But they are useless. They can only give you answers.”

 
Read the rest of this article at Salon

 


 

2. The Orlandi Code

“Emanuela, disappeared in 1983, the victim of one of Italy’s most enduring mysteries. For a country steeped in corruption, conspiracy and scandal, the saga of this young Vatican citizen with a love of music has an absorbing hold.”

 
Read the rest of this article at The Star

 


 

3. Lunch with the FT: Russell Brand

“Brand has been good at many things in his 39-year life. He has made people laugh. He has made them cross. He has had a genius for getting into scrapes, womanising, yoga and, more recently, for trying to incite his 8.4m Twitter followers to a peaceful revolution. Now, slightly annoyingly, it seems he could also have been good at writing interviews. His suggested intro is just like the one I was planning. Here is my version.”

 
Read the rest of this article at Financial Times

 


 

4. The Self-Made Man

“What I found is a mythology at once resilient and pliable, one that has been adapted by its purveyors again and again to suit the needs of the times. Benjamin Franklin is undoubtedly the original self-made man, but there’s only a passing resemblance between him and Andrew Carnegie, an exemplar of the ideal from a century later. (Franklin was a famous champion of industriousness, Carnegie a famous champion of leisure.) Indeed, Franklin might not even recognize the version of himself that became the subject of veneration in the decades following his death in 1790. The wave of Franklin biographies that appeared in the rapidly expanding republic of the early 1800s emphasized the qualities that spoke to aspiring men of business and fudged the ones that didn’t. From the beginning, selling the self-made dream to those who hoped to live it was a lucrative business itself. In a country where everyone thinks he’s bound to be a millionaire, you can make a fortune selling the secret to making that fortune.”

 
Read the rest of this article at Slate

 


 

5. The Origins of the Shroud of Turin

“There is enough uncertainty about the Shroud’s origins to convince some that it is the actual burial shroud of Christ. The mystery is deepened by the claim that no artefact has ever been the subject of so much research. However, when the scope of this research is considered, it is obvious that many areas of its history and the iconography of its images have not been fully explored. For example, the Shroud of Turin Research Project (STURP), which examined the Shroud in 1978, when it was still owned by the Savoy family, did not have a single expert in the history of relic cults, techniques of ancient weaving or the iconography of medieval painting on its team.”

 
Read the rest of this article at History Today


P.S. previous articles & more by P.F.M.     [images : one // two // three // four //  five // six // seven]

 
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